The Journal of Paul O’Leary: from the city to the outback is about a 10 year old boy who leaves Melbourne for Broome, in Western Australia, 4,000 km away. Reading Age: 10-12

This story has a conversational narrative recorded by a boy who was less articulate with language and study than with sport and boys’ games – his favourite pastime. He is a typical boy who had a close relationship with his mum and dad and friends. Not forgetting Lassie, his dog. And his desire to do well in all he tackled. The journal maintained a steady pace with credibility and engaged me.

Sandra Finger Lee, editor.

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This is a wonderful story about a boy named Paul, from Paul’s perspective. This would make it more enjoyable for children of this age to read. Being from the US I learnt some different words for things used in Australia. And the dreams Paul had were made quite vivid by the author.

Marion Lovato, reviewer.

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…Impressions will change inevitably as he grows up…precious memorabilia from the future. Plus there’s an account of a most fascinating experience of the outback in Australia.

MA reviewer.

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…A charming story tracing Paul’s journey. He has a great imagination, always wanting to explore. He finds friends and adventures everywhere and his father encourages him to keep a journal. Recommended if you want to relax with a detailed life of a 10 year old.

Robert Gillman, teacher, reviewer.

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A story of the great outback of Australia and a growing up 10-year-old. A wonderful story about 10-year-old Paul, as he with his father finally joined his mother into the great outback of Broome.

The description of the outback of Australia is really great, since I have experienced a part of the great outback myself and learned to love it. Such wonderful colours, no other country has.

And Paul’s dreams? Well, you really have to get the book to find that out…

G. Sedlmayer reviewer

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There are comprehension questions for each of the 20 chapters.

 

It is available now for $2.99 on Kindle

FREE at Kobo and Smashwords

and print on demand at CreateSpace for US$7.53 plus postage.

The A5 paperback is available for $20 plus $6 express post.

Also available as an eBook for $5 – 2017 special. Email Michael for the invoice.

 

Excerpt

5  My Last Days in Melbourne.

I was really tired by the time I arrived home and lay down before tea. Dad woke me about 6 pm with some of his spaghetti bolognaise. He let me work on his laptop afterwards but only for an hour. I used my notes and my workbook to do a timeline, and searched on the Internet for anything missing. I didn’t finish but there was always tomorrow.

There was also an email from an Andrew in the Scouts. This is a list of their activities:

Scouts in Broome is a unique outdoor and lifestyle focused adventure full of camping, campfires, hiking, orienteering, rope bridges, swimming, rafting, billy-cart racing, learning how to build really cool and amazing stuff (pizza ovens, floats, bows and arrows, snare traps, tee pees, and so on and so on …), also learning to stretch your imagination and learn and understand how ‘stuff works’ …. You get to make water rockets, plant your own veggie garden, learn about aboriginal culture and bush medicine, learn to handle snakes and reptiles (if your game), learn to survive in the bush with little or no food or gear …. Also engage your creative side by painting a sunset, making a sand castle, build your own 3d creation out of marshmallows and kebab sticks, sing songs and entertain with skits and plays and take part in our scouts got talent challenge.

 Yup just your normal raft up the Fitzroy with the croc’s and set up your tent in the reception of McDonalds …. or cruise around town in a double decker bus learning the history of our wonderful town. Taking part in the Anzac day parade in uniform, sitting down with the old war veterans and learning of their tales, hopping on board one of the navy ships for an under-deck privileged tour of the operating boat, or simply walking along Cable Beach and picking up rubbish from behind the sand dunes with the ranger.

Wow. It sounds really great and Dad was impressed as well. And  they meet on Tuesdays.

 

Dad has been busy packing up heaps of boxes and has lined them up outside under the verandah so they’ll stay dry. He has written on the outside of each box what’s inside and what is fragile. He hopes the removalists keep this in mind though he has wrapped up everything carefully. He’s used some doonas to wrap the crockery in. I think he’s done 50 so far which means we have an awful lot of stuff.

Dad has now packed his printers and the binder away so no more printing and binding of orders. He’s found a printer in Broome and has already put in an order as a school has ordered a book. He told them he won’t be up for another three weeks and they seemed okay with that.

We’re allowed six suitcases on the plane between us so I have to figure out what to take and what I want to wear before we leave. Most of my books I’ll leave behind or give to the op shop. That goes for my old clothes too, especially those I’ve outgrown.

I had a large garbage bag for the op shop. Each day I tried on some old clothes and if they didn’t fit, into the garbage bag they went. The same for my shoes. Dad said to take one good black leather pair, a  pair of sandals, and to wear my runners on the plane.  Being hot and wearing sandals all the time is my kind of heaven. I wonder if there are any snakes around and I’ve heard there are crocodiles in the mangroves so I’ll stay away from there.